PROPEL – BODY ON ROBOT ARM
Stelarc

The body was attached at the end of an industrial robot arm with a 3m task envelope. It choreographed the body’s trajectory, velocity and position/orientation in the space. The performance lasted for 35 min. The robot that choreographs the ear also carved it. These performances were supported by SymbioticA, as part of the DeMonstrable exhibition at the Lawrence Wilson Gallery. It was curated by Oron Catts, Elizabeth Stephens and Jennifer Johung, with the assistance of the Australia Council. Robot programming by Hayden Brown and James Boyle at Autronics. Special thanks to Paul Capon, Parallax Productions, Jim Tweddle, Wintech Engineering and Peter Bradbury, ABB Australia Pty Ltd.

 

PROPEL – EAR ON ROBOT ARM
Stelarc

The body size replica of Stelarc’s ear was coupled to an ABB IRB 6640 industrial robot arm and choreographed varying trajectory, velocity and position / orientation. This matched the choreography of the body on the robot arm. The robot that choreographs the ear is also the same robot that carves the sculpture. This animated installation was realised for the DeMonstrable exhibition at the Lawrence Wilson Gallery, Perth. The exhibition was co-curated by Oron Catts, Elizabeth Stephens and Jennifer Johung, with the assistance of the Australia Council. Robot programming by Hayden Brown and James Boyle at Autronics. Special thanks to Paul Capon, Parallax Productions, Jim Tweddle, Wintech Engineering and Peter Bradbury, ABB Australia Pty Ltd.

 

 


MUSCLES/MOTORS

Performance for Body and Robot
Stelarc and Raymond Sheh

A performance for 4 arms. Two human, two robot. The robot and human performer each interactively control the other. Contact microphones and telemetry controlled synthesizers on the robot arm combine with sounds induced by sensors on the human arm. Sounds are composed by the choreography of the human and robot limbs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Curtin Mechatronics Engineering student Warren Tarboton, working with Performance Artist and Director of the Alternate Anatomies Lab, Stelarc, has used advanced 3D printing technology to bring his creation to life… so to speak!

This cool robotic fish, complete with waterproof silicone skin and smartphone-activated controls, is so real it is accepted by real, living fish. See for yourself!

Dr Lei Cui, Lecturer at the Department of Mechanical Engineering is the project supervisor.

 

 

 

 

 

 


The AMBIDEXTROUS ARM is a prototype universal human-like arm with a manipulator that is double-jointed, allowing it to be both a left hand and a right hand all in one. It has online, real-time remote control. Position sensors make possible precise control. It is a compliant hand being actuated by pneumatic rubber muscles located in the forearm, with its finger and hand components 3D printed.

The Ambidextrous Arm was initiated by Stelarc and is a collaboration with the School of Engineering and Design at Brunel University London and the Alternate Anatomies Lab, School of Design and Art (SODA), Curtin University, Perth.